Snort Security Optimization

snort securityIn the previous two articles (part one part two), I discussed the installation of snort. In this article, I will mention some ways to improve snort security.

Improving Snort Security

One of the snort security issues is preventing unauthorized access to a privileged account. There are several ways of preventing this. First, when running snort in daemon (-D) mode, the user (-u) and group (-g) switches should be used. This will allow snort to run as a given user and group after it is initialized. Typically, most system administrators prefer to add the snort user and group to their systems, and that the snort user should be unable to login or initiate shell privileges.




Second, the source code for snort/DAQ binaries, logging directories, shared/static libraries, and configuration files should all be owned by the snort user with appropriate permissions. Finally, all binaries which are produced by the compiling and installation process of snort and DAQ should be verified using a hash function and the output stored on removable media. A cron job could be used to run this process on a regular basis with results e-mailed to a system administrator. Another alternative would be the use of a utility called tripwire for auditing installed software on a computer. All of these measures are excellent ways of increasing snort security.


Mirroring or Copying Network Traffic to Snort

In addition, your small office/home office (SOHO) router can be used to mirror or copy network traffic to a snort sensor running on a standalone system or to a virtual machine running in VirtualBox, VMWare, or Xen. This method of improving snort security can be easily done provided you have a router that is running DD-WRT, OpenWRT, or Tomato as the firmware. If you are running Tomato, you may have to add the following to your startup script:

modprobe ipt ROUTE

Users of OpenWRT must use the Tee option for IPtable (provided by module iptables-mod-tee). The module “iptabels-mod-tee” must be loaded before the following command will work:

iptables -t mangle-A PREROUTING -j TEE -gateway x.x.x.x

Where x.x.x.x is an IP address you wish to mirror traffic to (usually a system running snort). It should be noted that in more recent versions of OpenWRT (10.03.1 and never), iptables-mod-tee does not seem to be enabled by default, and using it will require a rebuild/re-enabling of modules for OpenWRT.

Now, using DD-WRT or Tomato’s GUI (or SSHing into the router), issue the following commands:

iptables -A PREROUTING -t mangle -j ROUTE -gw x.x.x.x -tee

iptables -A POSTROUTING -t mangle -j ROUTE -gw x.x.x.x -tee

In each case, x.x.x.x is the address of the machine running snort. To stop mirroring traffic, type

iptables -F -t mangle

If you have snort running in test mode (-T option), try starting snort with /etc/rc.d/snort start (you should get a running message if snort is running properly). If there is a problem, check the output in /var/log/messages. Also, you can check the status of snort by issuing this command:

./snort status


External Links:

How to make some home routers mirror traffic to Snort at www.snort.org

DD-WRT

OpenWRT

Tomato

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