Suricata Intrusion Detection: Part Four

Suricata

Configuring app parser settings in Suricata.

In the previous articles on Suricata, we covered installation, configuring global settings and pass lists, and began looking at setting up an interface. In this article, we will continue setting up our first Suricata interface. In this example, we are configuring the WAN interface.

Configuring App Parsing

The next tab after “WAN Flow/Stream” is “WAN App Parsers“. This tab deals with parsers that operate on the application layer of the TCP/P model, the layer that specifies certain protocols that cover major aspects of functionality such as FTP, SMTP, and others.

The first setting is “Asn1 (Abstract Syntax One) Max Frames“. Abstract Syntax one is a standard and notation that describes rules and structures for representing, encoding, transmitting, and decoding data in telecommunications and computer networking. Application later protocols such as X.400 e-mail, X.500 and LDAP directory services, H.323 (for VoIP) and SNMP use ASN.1 to describe the protocol data units they exchange. “Asn Max Frames” sets a limit for the maximum number of ASN.1 frames to decode (the default is 256).

The next heading is “DNS App-Layer Parser Settings“. Here, you can set parameters relevant to DNS, UDP and TCP parsing. “Global Memcap” and “Flow/State Memcap” set the global memcap and flow/state memcap limits respectively. The default global memcap is 16 MB and the flow/state memcap is 512 KB. The “Request Flood Limit” determines how many unreplied DNS requests are considered a flood; if this limit is reached, an alert is set. The default is 500. Finally, “UDP Parser” and “TCP Parser” enables UDP detection and parsing and TCP detection and parsing. The default for both settings is “yes“.


Below that is “HTTP App-Layer Parser Settings“. “Memcap” sets the memcap limit for the HTTP parser; the default is 64 MB. The “HTTP Parser” dropdown box allows you to enable or disable detection and parsing; there is also a third setting, “detection-only“, which enables detection but disables the parser. The final setting in this section is “Server Configurations“. Pressing the “plus” button allows you to add a new HTTP server policy configuration. You can set the “Engine Name“, as well an alias for the IP list to which the engine will be bound (you can specify “all” to bind the engine to all HTTP servers). The “Target Web Server Personality” allows you to choose the web server personality appropriate for the protected hosts. The default value is “IDS“, but you can set it for Apache 2 and different versions of Microsoft’s Internet Information Services. Below that are parameters for the request body limit and the response body limit, specifying the maximum number of HTTP request body and response body bytes to inspect, respectively. The default in each case is 4096 bytes. Setting either parameter to 0 causes Suricata to inspect the entire client-body or server-body. Finally, there are “Decode Settings“, which if set, will allow Suricata to decode the path and query. Checking the “URI Include-All” check box will include username, password, hostname and port in the normalized URI. Press “Save” at the bottom of the page to save settings for the server configuration or “Cancel” to cancel.

The last heading is “Other App-Layer Parser Settings“. Here, you can set detection and parsing options for several application-layer protocols such as TLS and SMTP. Each protocol has the option of [1] enabling detection and parsing; [2] disabling both detection and parsing, or [3] enabling detection but disabling parsing (“detection-only”). You can press “Save” to save your settings before you exit or “Reset“. Pressing sabe will rebuild the rules file, which may take several seconds. Suricata must also be restarted to activate any changes made.

Finally, the “Variables” tab allows you to set variables which can be used in rules. This prevents you from having to set IP addresses rule by rule. For example, after HOME_NET you can enter your home-IP address. Press “Save” at the bottom when you are done setting these variables.

That covers interface setup. Now that we have at least one interface configured, we can look at the logs. We will cover log settings in the next article.


External Links:

The official Suricata web site

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