Securing Ports and Services

Securing portsA computer system that is not connected to a network is a rarity. While this provides some flexibility in terms of remote services, data and information that are available, it also brings considerable risks. It is probably correct to assume that any computer connected to a network is in danger of being attacked in some way. Secure computer environments, in many cases used by government defense organizations, often have no contact with the outside world, even if they are networked to each other, and as a result, they often have greater success in securing ports and services.

The predominant network communications protocol is TCP/IP. It is the protocol used by the Internet and thus has supplanted most of the formerly popular protocols used for local area networks (LANs). However, TCP/IP was conceived to send and receive data reliably, not to secure it. Securing the data (and securing ports) is the job of applications listening and sending on specific ports.

TCP/IP defines a total of 65,535 ports of which 1023 are considered to be well-known ports. These are, of course, not physical ports into which network cables are connected, but rather virtual ports on each network connection which can be used by applications and services to communicate over a TCP/IP connection. In reality, the number of ports that are used by popular network clients and services comprises an even smaller subset of the well-known group of ports, which makes the task of securing ports somewhat easier.

There are a number of different TCP/IP services which can be provided by an operating system. Such services include HTTP for running a web server, FTP for allowing file transfers, SSH and Telnet for providing remote login access and SMTP for the transport of e-mail messages. Each service in turn is assigned a standard TCP/IP port. For example, port 80 is for HTTP requests; port 21 is for File Transfer Protocol (FTP); port 17 is for the quote of the day.


Securing Ports and Services: How It’s Done

A large part of securing ports and securing servers involves defining roles, and based on the roles, defining which services and ports should be enabled. For example, a server that is to act solely as a web server should only run the HTTP service, and perhaps SSH for remote administration access. All other services should be disabled, and ideally, removed entirely from the operating system. Removing the service will make it harder for an intruder to re-enable the service. Thus, while it is necessary for some ports to be open to Internet traffic, it is also necessary to ensure that only the bare minimum are exposed and that the software on the system is as up to date as possible.

Securing a system involves (a) removing any unnecessary services from the operating system and (b) ensuring that the ports associated with these non-essential services are blocked using a firewall.

Many operating systems are installed with a number of services installed and activated by default. Before installing a new operating system, it is essential that the installation be carefully planned. This involves deciding which services are not required and identifying which services have been installed and enabled by default. It helps if deployment is not rushed; the fewer services and open ports available on a system, the smaller the surface area and opportunities for attackers. In addition, it is essential to turn on automatic updates, both for Windows and Linux, as well as for your antivirus software.

As for the firewall, you will want to have a dedicated firewall between your network and the Internet. Although not absolutely essential, it is good practice to have a personal firewall on each computer. In securing ports, you should make sure your firewall is closed to all traffic other than to the ports you know should be open. Because some malicious software can silently open ports, it is a good idea to check them yourself and close any that you do not need open.


External Links:

TCP/UDP ports on Wikipedia

How to secure your TCP/IP ports at techradar.pro

ntop: An Introduction

ntopntop is a network probe that shows network usage. It displays a list of hosts that are currently using the network and reports information concerning the IP and non-IP traffic generated by each host. It is a simple, open source (GPL), portable traffic measurement and monitoring tool, which supports various management activities, including network optimization and planning, and detection of network security violations. In interactive mode, it displays the network status on the user’s terminal; in web mode, it acts as a web server, creating an HTML dump of the network status. ntop was developed by Luca Deri, a research scientist and network manager at the University of Pisa. It started development in 1997, and the first public release was in 1998 (v. 0.4). Version 2.0 was released in 2002 and added support for commercial protocols such as NetFlow v5 and sFlow v2, and version 3.0 was released in 2004 and added RRD support, as well as IPv6 and SCSI/FiberChannel support. Binaries for ntop are currently available for Ubuntu and Red Hat/CentOS.


Advantages of ntop

There are several advantages to using ntop. It is portable and platform neutral; you can deploy it wherever you want with the same look and feel. There are minimal requirements needed to leverage its use. Finally, it is suitable for monitoring both a LAN (by default) and a WAN (if ntop is configured properly).

We can classify the network activity measured by ntop into two categories: traffic measurement and traffic characterization and monitoring. Traffic measurement covers data sent and received, including volume and packets, classified according to network and IP protocol, as well as multicast traffic, TCP session history, bandwidth measurement and analysis, VLAN and AS traffic statistics, and VoIP monitoring. Traffic characterization and monitoring involves observing network flows as well as protocol utilization, ARP and ICMP monitoring, and detection of popular P2P protocols. Monitoring such traffic can be an aid in network optimization and planning which encompasses identification of routers and Internet servers, traffic distribution, service mapping, and mapping network traffic.

In the next article, I will cover integration of ntop into your network.


External Links:

The official ntop site

Traffic Shaping Wizard: Introduction

traffic shaping wizard

These are the options seen under the Wizards tab in the Traffic Shaper in pfSense 2.1.

Traffic Shaping Wizard Introduced

You can configure the traffic shaper through one of the traffic shaping wizards, manually through the pfSense web GUI, or even at by editing pf.conf in FreeBSD at the command line. It is recommended, however, that when you are using the traffic shaper for the first time, you use the traffic shaping wizard, which will guide you through the process. Due to the complexity of the shaper queues and rules, it is not a good idea to attempt starting out configuring the traffic shaper manually. If you need custom rules, step through the wizard and approximate what you will need, then make the custom rules afterward. Each screen will set up unique queues and rules that will control what traffic is assigned to the queues. If you want to configured everything manually, simply specify your WAN speed at the first screen, then click Next through all the remaining screens without actually configuring anything.


To start the traffic shaping wizard under pfSense 2.1, navigate to Firewall -> Traffic Shaper, and click on the “Wizards” tab. There are several different wizards, each one pertaining to a different pfSense network interface setup:

  • Single LAN multi WAN: There is one local network, but there are multiple interfaces for the WAN (this would be common in a load balancing scenario, in which outgoing and incoming traffic is distributed among two or more WAN interfaces). NOTE: You would also use this in the case where you only have one WAN and one LAN. Just specify 1 for the number of WAN links when going through the wizard
  • Single WAN multi LAN: There is only a single WAN interface, but there are multiple local networks.
  • Multiple LAN/WAN: This will set up traffic shaping in cases where you have both multiple local networks and multiple WAN networks.
  • Dedicated Links: This is for when you want to manage more than one link which gets routerd to a separate, different LAN in the same box. For example, assume you were providing services to 4 different customers in one building and they each had their own separate internet connections. You could run all 4 internet connections through a single pfSense box and provide different traffic shaping configurations for each. Thus, you could have several “virtual” links through a single interface.

In the next article, we will begin working our way through the traffic shaping wizard and look at the different options available within it.


Other Articles in This Series:

Traffic Shaping in pfSense: What it Does
QoS Management Using the Traffic Shaper Wizard
Queue Configuration in pfSense 2.1
Traffic Shaping Rules in pfSense 2.1
Layer 7 Groups in pfSense 2.1
Bandwidth Limiting with the pfSense Limiter
Deep Packet Inspection Using Layer 7 Traffic Shaping

External Links:

Traffic shaping at Wikipedia

External Links:

Traffic Shaping Guide at doc.pfsense.org

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pfSense Traffic Shaping: Part One

pfSense Traffic Shaping

The traffic shaping wizard page in the pfSense web GUI.

Traffic shaping (also known as “packet shaping”, or “Quality of Service” [QoS]) is a computer network traffic management technique which prioritizes some datagrams while delaying other datagrams to bring them into compliance with a desired traffic profile. It is a form of rate limiting (a method of controlling traffic by which traffic that exceeds a specified rate is dropped or delayed) and is used to optimize or guarantee performance, improve latency, and/or increase usable bandwidth for some kinds of packets by delaying other kinds. It is widely used for network traffic engineering, and often appears in ISPs’ networks as one of several Internet Traffic Management Practices (ITMPs).

pfSense Traffic Shaping: An Example

pfSense Traffic Shaping

Configuring VoIP settings in the pfSense traffic shaping wizard.

In the following example, we will use pfSense traffic shaping to limit VoIP throughput to 125 kbps. First, navigate to Firewall -> Traffic Shaper. Select the “Wizards” tab. From the Wizards table, click on “Single WAN multi LAN“. [Assume we have a LAN and a DMZ.] On the next page, at “Enter number of LAN type connections“, enter “2”. At “Link Upload“, type the upload bandwidth (remembering to select either Kbit/s, Mbit/s, or Gbit/s in the drop-down boxes), and at “Link Download“, type the download bandwidth. Leave the other settings unchanged and click the “Next” button.

The next page deals with VoIP settings. At “Enable“, click on the check box to prioritize VOIP traffic. Under “VOIP specific settings“, assume we’re using Asterisk for VoIP and at “Provider” select “Asterisk/Vonage“. Set “Upload Speed” to 125 Kilobit/s, and set “Download Speed” to 125 Kilobit/s. Leave the other settings unchanged and click the “Next” button.


The next page, “PenaltyBox“, allows us to reduce the priority of an IP address or alias. We will assume that we have no use for this feature right now and click on the “Next” button.

pfSense Traffic Shaping

The final page in the pfSense traffic shaping wizard

The next page is for peer-to-peer networking and allows you to lower the priority and/or disable about 20 different specific P2P protocols. There is also a “P2P Catch all” queue which allows us to place all uncategorized traffic into the P2P queue. Again, we will assume that we have no use for this feature now and click on the “Next” button.

The next page is for network games, and allows us to raise the priority of gaming traffic and/or enable/disable specific games (e.g. Call of Duty, Unreal Tournament, World of Warcraft, and several others). Again we will click the “Next” button.

The final page, “Other Applications“, allows us to shape other common types of traffic. These include remote access programs like PC Anywhere, messaging programs like IRC and Teamspeak, VPN traffic, and other programs. Click on the “Next” button. On the next page, click the “Finish” button to apply the new settings.

We now have used pfSense traffic shaping to prioritize VoIP traffic while also limiting the amount of VoIP throughput to 125 Kbit/s. In part two of this series on traffic shaping, I will cover the Hierarchical Fair Service Curve, one of several traffic shaping algorithms supported by pfSense. In part three, I will cover class based queuing and priority queuing.


External Links:

Traffic Shaping Guide at doc.pfsense.org (with links)

Firewall Rules in pfSense: Part One

Firewall Rules: Part One

Firewall: Rules page in the pfSense web GUI.

In the previous article about NAT port forwarding, we used “Add associated filter rule” in order to generate the firewall rule for the Apache web server. We could, however, have chosen “None” for the “Filter Rule Association” and created the rule ourselves. This next article describes how to create firewall rules.


Adding Firewall Rules

In order to do this, first browse to Firewall -> Rules. There will be two pre-configured firewall rules by default: “Block private networks” (for blocking 10.x.x.x, 172.16.x.x, and 192.168.x.x addresses) and “Block bogon networks” (for blocking bogus addresses). There will be at least three tabs: “Floating“, “WAN” and “LAN“. Select “WAN” if it isn’t already selected. Press the “Plus” button to add a new firewall rule. Under “Action”, there are three options: “Pass“, “Block”, and “Reject“. The web GUI has the following explanation of the difference between “Block” and “Reject“:

Hint: the difference between block and reject is that with reject, a packet (TCP RST or ICMP port unreachable for UDP) is returned to the sender, whereas with block the packet is dropped silently. In either case, the original packet is discarded.

In this case, you can leave the default unchanged as “Pass“. Next is the option to “Disable this rule“; we don’t want to do this so leave this box unchecked. At “Interface”, you will again have a choice of “LAN“, “WAN” and whatever other interfaces were configured; choose “WAN“.

Firewall Rules: Part One

Adding a firewall rule in pfSense.

At “Protocol“, there are a number of options in addition to the four listed under NAT port forwarding. “ICMP” stands for Internet Control Message Protocol and is used to send error messages indicating, for example, that a requested service is not available or that a host or router could not be reached. ICMP can also be used to relay query messages. “AH” stands for Authentication Header, which is part of the IPsec suite and provides connectionless integrity and data origin authentication for IP datagrams and provides protection against replay attacks. “IGMP” stands for Internet Group Management Protocol and is a connectionless protocol used by hosts and adjacent routers on IP networks to establish multicast group memberships; it is used for one-to-many networking applications such as online streaming video and gaming, among other uses. “OSPF” stands for Open Shortest Path First, a link-state routing protocol for IP networks that uses a link state routing algorithm and falls into the group of interior routing protocols. “CARP” stands for Common Address Redundancy Protocol, a protocol which allows multiple hosts on the same local network to share a set of IP addresses. Its primary purpose is to provide failover redundancy. Finally, “pfsync” is a computer protocol used to synchronize firewall states between machines running Packet Filter (PF) for High Availability. If is used along with CARP to make sure a backup firewall has the same information as the main firewall. In this case, we should leave the default protocol “TCP” unchanged.


At “Source“, specify “any”, as the “Type” and at “Source Port Range“, also specify any. The “Type” options are the same as the options under “Source” and “Destination” for NAT port forwarding; therefore I will not go into detail on them here. In “Destination“, select “Single host or alias” as the type, and specify 192.168.1.125 (our Apache server) for the “Address”. At “Destination Port Range“, specify “HTTP“. You can leave “Log packets that are handled by this rule” unchecked unless you have reason to log the packets. Specify a “Description” if you wish and press the “Save” button to save the changes.

Firewall Rules: The Source Port Range is Usually Unknown

It should be noted that when a firewall rule is created, the “Source Port Range” is almost always set to “any“. This is because the client decides which port to open on the client computer, which may or may not be the same as the port requested on the server. The source port is an an ever-changing port which the end user probably never knows about. So most of the time, we will not know the Source Port Range of the traffic being allowed in.

In the next article, I will go into some detail on rules governing firewall rules, and some of the advanced options for firewall rules under pfSense 2.0.

External Links:

Firewall Rule Basics at doc.pfsense.org

Port Forwarding with NAT in pfSense

Firewall Configuration: NAT port forwarding

Firewall -> NAT configuration page in the pfSense web GUI.

In computer networking, Network Address Translation (NAT) is the process of modifying IP address information in IPv4 headers while in transit across a traffic routing device. In most cases, it involves translating from the WAN IP address to the 192.168.x.x addresses of your local network. In this article, I will describe how to set up NAT port forwarding.

NAT and firewall rules are distinct and separate. NAT rules forward traffic, while firewall rules block or allow traffic. In the next article, I will cover firewall rules, but for now keep in mind that just because a NAT rule is forwarding traffic does not mean the firewall rules will allow it.

NAT Port Forwarding

NAT port forwarding rules can differ in complexity, but in this example, let’s assume we set up an Apache server at 192.1.168.125 on the local network, and we want to direct all HTTP traffic (port 80) to that address. First, browse to Firewall -> NAT. The options are “Port Forward“, “1:1” and “Outbound“. Select the “Port Forward” tab. Click the “plus” button in order to create a new NAT port forward rule. “Disable the rule” and “No RDR” can be left unchanged. For “Interface” you can choose WAN and LAN; we are concerned about incoming requests from the Internet, so you can keep it as WAN.


For “Protocol”, there are five choices: TCP, UDP, TCP/UDP, GRE, and ESP. TCP stands for Transmission Control Protocol, and is the transport level protocol of the Internet protocol suite. This is usually what we want to use. Next is UDP, or User Datagram Protocol, another transport level protocol which is also part of the Internet protocol suite. It is suitable for purposes where error checking and correction are either not necessary or are performed in the application. GRE stands for Generic Routing Encapsulation, a tunneling protocol that can encapsulate a wide variety of network layer protocols inside virtual point-to-point links. It can be used, among other things, in conjunction with PPTP to create VPNs. ESP stands for Encapsulating Security Payload, a member of the IPsec protocol suite which provides authenticity, integrity and confidentiality protection of packets. In this port forwarding scenario, you can leave the protocol unchanged (TCP).

Firewall Configuration: NAT

Adding a NAT port forwarding rule.

For “Source“, you can specify the allowed client source. Typically you can leave it as “any”, but there are several choices: “Single host or alias“, “Network“, “PPTP clients“, “PPPoE clients“, “L2TP clients“, “WAN subnet“, “WAN address“, “LAN subnet“, and “LAN address“. In this case, you can leave the default (any) unchanged.

For “Source port range“, we want to redirect HTTP traffic (port 80), so choose HTTP for the from and to drop-down boxes. “Destination” offers the same choices as “Source” and can be left unchanged. “Destination port range” should be changed to HTTP for the from and to drop-down boxes. For “Redirect target IP“, specify the web server the traffic to be forwarded to (in our case, 192.168.1.125). For “Redirect target Port“, choose HTTP. Next is “No XMLRPC Sync“; enable this option to prevent this rule from being applied to any redundant firewalls using CARP. This option can be left unchecked now. “NAT Reflection” can be enabled or disabled, usually it is disabled. “Filter Rule association” will automatically create a firewall rule and associate it to this NAT rule. Check this box to avoid having to create a separate firewall rule. Add a description if you wish, and press “Save” to save the changes. The port forwarding rule set up should now be in effect.

NAT Port Redirection

In this case, we passed traffic from port 80 on the source to port 80 on the destination, which is the classic port forwarding scenario. But there’s no reason you can’t redirect traffic to a different port. There are two reasons you might want to do this:

[1] Security: A good way to thwart hackers is to put services on non-standard ports. For example, everyone knows the standard port for FTP is 21, but an outsider is unlikely to find your FTP server if you place it on port 69, or better yet, an even higher port number (e.g. 51782). The same can be said of SSH. Users will have to know the port in order to access it.

[2] Single Public IP Address, more than one computer with the same services: Smaller networks with only a single public IP address may be stuck if the want to expose a lot of public services. For example, imagine that we want to have two separate FTP servers, but on two separate computers. With port redirection, we create two different NAT rules: the first rule will redirect port 51782 to port 21 on FTPServer1, and the second will redirect port 51783 to port 21 on FTPServer2. We can then remote into two separate FTP servers on two different computers using the same IP address.


External Links:

Port Forwarding Troubleshooting at doc.pfsense.org

pfSense Setup: Part Four (Setting up a DMZ)

DMZ

The optional interface configuration page in the pfSense web GUI (which is similar to the WAN and LAN config pages).

In the first three parts, I covered booting and installing pfSense, general configuration options in the pfSense web GUI, and configuring WAN and LAN interfaces (also with the web GUI). In this part, I cover using an optional interface to create a DMZ.

In networking, a DMZ (de-militarized zone) is a place where some traffic is allowed to pass and some traffic is not. The area is separate from the LAN and WAN. In simple terms, a DMZ looks like this in relation to the rest of the network:

Internet traffic | <- DMZ <- LAN

Unsafe Internet traffic is allowed to enter the DMZ, but not the LAN. To configure it, we will need an optional interface.

Configuring the DMZ

From the web GUI, browse to Interfaces -> OPT1. If “Enable Interfaces” isn’t checked, check it. Set “Description” to DMZ. Under “Type”, choose “Static” as the address configuration method. For “IP address”, enter an IP address and the subnet mask (the subnet should be different than the subnet for your LAN). For example, if your subnet for the LAN is 192.168.1.x, it could be 192.168.2.x for the optional interface.

For “Gateway”, leave this option set to “None”. The last two options are “Block private networks” and “Block bogon networks”. Ensure that these two options are unchecked; we don’t want the system to block access from the Internet to the DMZ. Finally save changes by pressing the “Save” button.


Now that the DMZ is configured, your DMZ will allow WAN access. Your DMZ will also allow access from the LAN, but it won’t be permitted to send traffic to the LAN. This will allow devices on the Internet to access DMZ resources without being able to access any of your LAN. This could be useful, for example, for setting up an e-mail or FTP server.

You could now attach a switch to your DMZ interface. This would enable you to connect multiple machines to the DMZ.

External Links:

Setting Up a DMZ in pfSense


The Rest of the Guide:

Part One (installation from LiveCD)

Part Two (configuration using the web GUI)

Part Three (WAN and LAN settings)

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pfSense Setup: Part Three (WAN and LAN Settings)

In pfSense Setup: Part Two,  I covered General Settings within the pfSense web GUI. In this part, I cover configuring the WAN and LAN interfaces. There are a number of different options here; fortunately, pfSense makes the job easy on us by creating reasonable defaults. From the pfSense web GUI menu, go to Interfaces -> WAN.

pfSense Setup: WAN Interface Settings

WAN

The WAN settings page in the pfSense web GUI.

The WAN interface provides your connection to the Internet. To access the WAN, you will need a properly-configured WAN interface and an Internet connection. Typically your Internet connection will be through a cable modem provided by your Internet service provider (ISP), but pfSense will support other connection methods as well.

To configure the WAN interface, browse to Interfaces | WAN. Under “General Configuration”, check Enable Interface. You can change the description of the interface (Description).

The next item is “Type”. Here you can choose the interface type. “Static” requires you to type in the WAN interface IP address. “DHCP” gets the IP address from the ISP’s DHCP server, and is probably what you want to select. “PPP” stands for Point-to-Point Protocol, a protocol used for dialup modem connects as well as T-carrier, E-carrier connections, SONET and SDH connections and higher bitrate optical connections. “PPPoE” stands for Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet and is used by a number of DSL providers. “PPTP” stands for Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol and is a method for implementing virtual private networks (VPNs); unless your WAN interface is a VPN you won’t want to choose this option. “L2TP” stands for Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol, a tunneling protocol also used with VPNs.

The next option is MAC address. Typing in a MAC address here allows you to “spoof” a MAC address. The DHCP servers of ISPs assign IP addresses based on MAC addresses. But they have no way of verifying a MAC address, so by typing a different MAC address, you can “force” your ISP’s DHCP server to give you another IP address. Unless you want to spoof your MAC address, you can leave this field blank. MTU stands for maximum transmission unit. Larger MTUs bring greater efficiency but also greater latency. This should probably be left unchanged. MSS stands for maximum segment size, and specifies the largest amount of data pfSense can receive in a single TCP segment. This also should likely be left unchanged.


The next section is different depending on what you selected for the interface type. If you selected “DHCP”, the options will be “Hostname” and “Alias IP Address”. Hostname can be left blank unless your ISP requires it for client identification, and Alias IP address can also be left blank unless the ISP’s DHCP client needs an alias IP address.

The next section is “Private Networks”. Checking “Block private networks” ensures that 10.x.x.x, 172.16.x.x, and 192.168.x.x addresses, as well as loopback addresses (127.x.x.x) are non-routable. This should be left checked under most circumstances. “Block bogon networks” blocks traffic from IP addresses either reserved or not yet assigned by IANA. This should be left checked as well, for obvious reasons.

Save the options and move on to Interfaces -> LAN.

pfSense Setup: LAN Interface Settings

WAN

The LAN settings page in the pfSense web GUI.

Under “General Configuration”, “Enable Interface” should be checked, since unchecking it will prevent the local network from connecting to the router. “Description” allows you to type in a description of the interface.

“Type” allows you to choose an interface type. See the section on WAN settings for an explanation of each of the options. “MAC address” allows you to type in a different MAC address in order to do MAC address spoofing. Again, see the section on WAN interface settings for a more detailed explanation. “MTU” and “MSS” are also explained under WAN settings. “Speed and duplex” allows you to explicitly set speed and duplex mode for the interface; pfSense should autodetect this, so this option should be left unchanged.

If you selected “Static” for the interface, there should be a “Static IP Configuration” section with two options: “IP address” and “Gateway”. With “IP address”, you can change the IP address of the LAN interface (it defaults to 192.168.1.1).

The next section is “Private networks”. The two options are “Block private networks” and “Block bogon networks”. See the section on configuring the WAN interface for detailed explanations of these options.

That does it for WAN and LAN settings. In pfSense Setup: Part Four, I will take a look at setting up an optional interface.


The Rest of the Guide:

Part One (installation from LiveCD)

Part Two (configuration using the web GUI)

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pfSense Setup: Part Two

pfSense Setup

The General Setup menu in the pfSense web GUI.

If you followed the setup instructions in pfSense Setup: Part One, pfSense should be running and accessible via the web interface at 192.168.1.1 (or another IP address if you assigned a different one). You should be able to log in using the default username (admin) and password (pfsense).

You will want to change some of the basic settings in General Setup. In the web interface, browse to System | General Setup. At “Hostname”, enter your hostname (the name that will be used to access the machine by name instead of the IP address.

Below this, enter your domain (Domain in the General Settings).

DNS Servers can also be specified. By default, pfSense will act as the primary DNS server. However, other DNS servers may be used, and the place to enter them are in the four boxes for DNS servers.

Check Allow DNS server list to be overridden by DHCP/PPP on WAN. This ensures that DNS requests that cannot be resolved internally are passed on to the WAN and resolved by the external DNS servers provided by your internet service provider.


Next, select the correct time zone; you probably want to leave the default NTP time server as it is.

Next is the theme, which allows you to change the look and feel of the pfSense web GUI. You can probably keep the default theme, pfSense_ng.

pfSense Setup

pfSense’s User Manager, which has been part of the pfSense web GUI since version 2.0.

NOTE: You probably want to change the admin password. You can do this under System -> User Manager. Here you can change the admin password, add new users, and delete users, including the admin.

That’s it for the General Setup within the web GUI. In pfSense Setup: Part Three, I will cover how to configure the WAN and LAN interfaces using the web GUI. Part four will cover configuring optional interfaces.


External Links:

Another useful guide on installing and configuring pfSense (from the iceflatline blog)

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© 2013 David Zientara. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy