NoMachine Client Installation and Configuration

NoMachine

Running the ps command on a computer running Xvnc.

In the previous article, we covered installation of the NoMachine server under Linux Mint. In this article, we will cover installing and running the NoMachine client under Windows.

First, we have to make sure vncviewer is running on the computer running the NoMachine server. This can be done by typing vncserver in a terminal window. You can also specify several options. For example:

vncserver -geometry 800×600

would create a VNC desktop 800 pixels wide and 600 pixels deep. The following command:

vncserver :1

would create a VNC desktop with a display number of 1 (omitting this parameter causes VNC to use the next available display number). This command:

vncserver -depth 24

creates a VNC desktop with a pixel depth of 24 (true color). Other permissible values are 8, 16 and 15. Consult the vncserver man page for other options.

Once you have started vncserver, you probably want to check to make sure it is running. To do so, you can type:

ps -eaf | grep Xvnc

If XVnc is running, you should see a line similar to the one in the screenshot shown at the beginning of this article.

Downloading and Installing the NoMachine Client in Windows

NoMachine

The NoMachine setup wizard.

Now we need to install the NoMachine client in Windows. First, we download the client at the NoMachine web site. Then run the NoMachine executable, either by selecting Run from the Start menu and selecting the executable, or by clicking on the executable in Windows in windows Explorer.

You will be presented with the NoMachine Setup Wizard dialog box. Click on “Next” to continue installation. The next dialog box contains the End-User License Agreement (EULA); if you agree with the terms, click on the “I accept the agreement” radio button and click “Next“. The next dialog box allows you to change the installation path; if you want to install the NoMachine client into a different directory, change it here and click “Next“. The software will install now. You may see dialog boxes which read “The software you are installing has not passed Windows Logo testing”; if so, click on “Continue Anyway” to continue. Once installation has completed, a dialog box will appear to inform you so; click on “Finish“.


From the Start menu, navigate to Programs -> NoMachine -> NoMachine to start the NoMachine client. If this is the first time you are running the program, the first window will show you how to use the program. Click on “Continue” to advance to the next screen.

If this is the first time you have run the NoMachine client, the next screen will be the “Create New Connection” wizard. Here you can enter the IP address of the computer to which you want to connect. Once you have set up the remote computer, double-click on it to connect to the computer.

After a few seconds, the NoMachine client will prompt you for login credentials. Enter your username and password; if you want NoMachine to save the password, check the “Save the password in the connection file” check box. Once you are done, click “OK“. After another few seconds, you should be connected to the remote computer. If this is the first time you have run NoMachine, there will be two screens with instructions on how to use the interface. After that, You will see a screen that gives you the following choices: [1] Display the menu panel covering all screen (the default), or [2] Display the menu panel as a window. Choose the way you want the menu panel displayed and click “OK“.

The next screen controls the option for audio streaming. Audio is forwarded to the client, but you can control whether audio is played on the remote server. Check the “Mute audio on the server while I’m connected” to mute the audio, and click on “OK“. The next screen controls the option for display resolution. If the remote machine has a different resolution than the client, you can check the “Change the server resolution to match the client when I connect” check box to make sure the resolution matches. Click the “OK” button when you are done choosing this option.

Now you should be connected to the remote desktop. If you want to change the settings for the client, hover your mouse over the upper right corner; when the page-turning icon appears, click on it and the settings will appear. There are seven options here: “Input“, “Devices“, “Display“, “Audio“, “Mic in“, “Recording“, and “Connection“. Click the icon for the settings you want to change. You can now change settings; click on “Done” when you are finished and click “Done” again to exit out of the settings screen and return to the remote desktop.


External Links:

The official NoMachine web site

NoMachine Server Installation and Configuration

NoMachine

Installing the NoMachine server using the Debian package installer (dpkg).

In the previous article, we introduced the X Window system and discussed different X Window remote desktop options. In this article, I will cover installation of the NoMachine remote desktop server and the various server options.

To set up the NoMachine server, download and install it whatever method is appropriate for your Linux distribution. As far as I know, it is not in any of the repos. To install the NoMachine server under Linux Mint, I downloaded NoMachine for Debian Linux and used the Debian package installer to install it:

sudo dpkg -i nomachine.4.1.29.5.i386.deb

After a few minutes, the NoMachine server was installed and ready to use.Depending on the distribution you are using, the installation may be more involved. Most of the major distributions should have packages available that make the installation relatively painless.


Configuring the NoMachine Server

Once it is installed, you can launch the NoMachine server (on Linux Mint, it can be found in the Internet program group). The NoMachine server interface has two tabs: one called “Connected users” and a second for “Active transfers“. There is also a “Connections” option to toggle allowing connections. There is also a button called “Connection preferences“.

NoMachine

The Services tab under Connection Preferences in the NoMachine server interface.

In “Connection preferences”, there are six separate tabs: “Services“, “Security“, “Devices“, “Transfers“, “Performance“, and “Updates“. “Services” lists the network services running and allows you to configure the services. In this case, we are running the NX service on port 4000. There are two other options: “Start automatic services at startup“, which causes services marked as automatic to be started when the machine starts. “Advertise this computer on the network” causes NoMachine to broadcast the required information to let other computers discover it on the local network.

The next tab is “Security Preferences“. There are three options here: “Require permission to let remote users connect“, which if selected requires the local user to accept the connection before the remote user can connect to the desktop. The second is “Require permission to let the remote users interact with the desktop“, which if selected causes the users to connect in view-only mode. The third option is “Hide the NoMachine icon in system tray“; if this is selected, the NoMachine menu won’t be accessible in normal conditions, but notifications will be still displayed when somebody connects.

The “Devices” tab controls what devices are made available to the remote user. Disks, printers, USB devices, smart card readers, and network ports are selected by default. There is also an “Enable audio streaming and microphone forwarding” check box which is selected by default. The “Transfers” tab controls transfer preferences. Here you can allow or deny the uploading of files by remote users, and allow or deny the downloading of files. You can also disallow files bigger than a certain size for both uploads and downloads, and set the directory to which files are saved.

The “Performance” tab controls system performance and has four options. “Use a specific display encoding” allows the user to select from a dropdown list of encoding algorithms, including VP8, MJPEG and H264. “Request a specific framerate” allows the user to select a framerate from a dropdown list (a higher frame rate uses more processing power). “Use acceleration for display processing” uses the GPU and accelerated graphics (when available) for better performance. “Use lightweight mode in virtual sessions” causes virtual sessions to only use the X protocol compression, which may require less bandwidth and less computing resources.

The final tab is “Update“, which controls update preferences. There is an “Automatically check for updates” check box, as well as a button to check for updates immediately. This tab also includes information about the product, version number and platform.

Now that we have covered server configuration, in the next article we will cover accessing the system remotely using NoMachine.


External links:

The official NoMachine site

netfilter Operation: Part Twelve (Firewall Builder continued)

Firewall Builder

Firewall Builder on startup.

NOTE: After I posted this article, I found out it’s possible to add objects/networks/hosts/etc. by right-clicking items on the object tree under the Linux version of Firewall Builder. This article has been amended accordingly.

In the previous article, I introduced Firewall Builder, including some notes on installation under Windows and Linux. In this article, I will step through the process of adding a firewall object and configuring it.

Firewall Builder: Creating a Firewall Object

In this example, I installed Firewall Builder under Linux Mint. Initially, there are three main options in the main dialog area: “Create New Firewall“, “Import Existing Configuration“, and “Watch ‘Getting Started’ Tutorial“. click on “Create New Firewall“, which will open the New Firewall dialog box.

Firewall Builder

The New Firewall dialog box.

In the New Firewall dialog box, enter the name for the new firewall (in this case OFFICE01). For the firewall software, select iptables from the dropdown box. For the OS, choose Linux 2.4/2.6 and click Next. The next window allows you to configure the interfaces on the firewall. You can do it manually, or if the firewall is running SNMP, you can discover them via SNMP. Here, we select Configure interfaces manually and click Next. This will bring up the manual configuration window. Enter the relevant information for each network interface. The name must correspond to the actual interface name (which is the same as if you had entered ifconfig on the Linux host), such as eth0. The Label is a human friendly name for easy reference such as OUTSIDE. When you are done entering the information for a given interface click Add. When you have entered the information for all interfaces (typically at least an INSIDE and OUTSIDE), click Finish. You must designate one of the interfaces on the firewall as the management interface, typically the INSIDE interface. Do this by navigating to the firewall in the object tree. As you select each interface in the object tree, there is a “Management interface” checkbox in the dialog area. Check this box for the interface you want to use. This will be the interface that Firewall Builder uses to connect and upload the firewall rules to.


Firewall Builder: Adding a Network

Firewall Builder

The button for adding new networks/hosts/services/etc is in the upper left, adjacent to the back arrow button.

Now that you have the basic firewall defined, you need to define something for it to talk to. In this case, we will assume that 192.168.1.0/24 is you internal network, and you want to allow outbound Web browsing and access to an internal Web server (WEB1). For starters, you need to create an object to represent the internal network. Follow these steps to create the network object:

  1. Navigate to Objects -> Networks in the object tree ((in order to make the object tree visible, you may have to go to the View menu and unselect Editor Panel).
  2. Right-click Networks and select New Network.
  3. Enter INTERNAL for the name of the network, and use 192.168.1.0 for the Address field. Enter 255.255.255.0 for the Netmask.
  4. Next, we’ll create an internal Web server at 192.168.1.2.  Right-click Objects -> Hosts in the object tree and select New Host.
  5. Enter WEB1 for the name of the object. Click the Use preconfigured template host objects check box and click Next.
  6. Select PC with one interface and click Finish.
  7. Expand the object tree to User -> Objects -> Hosts -> WEB1 -> eth0 -> WEB1. Edit the IP address to be 192.168.1.2 and click Apply.
  8. Next, define the appropriate services to allow Web-browsing. Navigate in the object tree to Services -> TCP, right-click on it, and select New Service.
  9. Enter HTTP for the name. Leave the source port ranges at zero, but change the destination port range to start and end at 80.
  10. Repeat the previous two steps for HTTPS on port 443 for secure Web pages.

Now that we have created the network object, in the next article, we will cover defining the firewall rules to allow inbound web traffic and uploading the rules to the firewall.


External Links:

The official Firewall Builder web site

Using Firewall Builder on Linux to Create Firewalls from Scratch on linux.com

Firewall Builder Tutorial: The Basics on YouTube

© 2013 David Zientara. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy